medievalpoc:

unfantasmarecoreeuropa submitted to medievalpoc:

Christoph Weiditz´s Trachtenbuch

Weiditz was a german artist of the XVIth century at the service of the Habsburgs who dedicated a year painting the everyday of the people of the territories of Spain, including, Netherlands, Rousillon and the both Sicilies.

In his drawings we can see, among paintings of other spanish people without any reference to otherness, black people and moriscos.

He also painted some aztecs brought from Nueva España to the royal court, that are some of the first images known of aztec people drawn from life.

Sources:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Weiditz

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Trachtenbuch_des_Christoph_Weiditz

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Christoph_Weiditz

http://viaf.org/viaf/59421291/

http://catalogue.bnf.fr/servlet/RechercheEquation;jsessionid=E881875E735E237F1EC10CA41097FF22?TexteCollection=HGARSTUVWXYZ1DIECBMJNQLOKP&TexteTypeDoc=DESNFPIBTMCJOV&Equation=IDP%3Dcb158503661&host=catalogue

http://www.smith.edu/vistas/vistas_web/gallery/detail/aztec-juggler.htm

Hampe, Theodor. 1994 [1927]. Authentic Everyday Dress of the Renaissance: All 154 Plates from the “Trachtenbuch.” New York: Dover Publications.

Massing, Jean Michel. 1991. “Early European Images of America: The Ethnographic Approach.” In Circa 1492: Art in the Age of Exploration, Jay Levenson, ed., pp. 515-520. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art.

Ausgabe von Theodor Hampe: Das Trachtenbuch des Weiditz von seinen Reisen nach Spanien (1529) und den Niederlanden (1531/32). 1927 

Andrea McKenzie Satterfield: The assimilation of the marvelous other: Reading Christoph Weiditz’s Trachtenbuch (1529) as an ethnographic document.

[mod note]

unfantasmarecoreeuropa's submission is so huge I have to break it up into a few posts! I will be adding the rest of the submission to the medievalpoc queue. What I love about these is the effort to depict average people and daily life during the early Renaissance.

(via liz-of-all-ladybirds)

435 notes

dad-rock-davos:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rachellebutler:

Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.
Source

all musicians across all time periods: “fuck how does that thing go”

Beethoven didn’t even try

dad-rock-davos:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rachellebutler:

Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.

Source

all musicians across all time periods: “fuck how does that thing go”

Beethoven didn’t even try

(via liz-of-all-ladybirds)

16,478 notes

smithsonianlibraries:

Cats are critical to posters, apparently. A smattering of kitties appear in Posters, a critical study of the development of poster design in continental Europe, England and America by Charles Matlack Price.

Price obviously knew the importance of cats in art. He certainly had strong feelings about the topic of art, going so far as to include the quote above from Robert Louis Stevenson as the epigraph to the book. And since we see 2 kitties gracing the title page, we can deduce that his idea of good art = cats. But I’m no art historian.

(via missingrache)

636 notes

"War as a moral metaphor is limited, limiting, and dangerous. By reducing the choices of actions to a ‘war against’ whatever-it-is, you divide the world into Me or Us (good) and Them or It (bad) and reduce the ethical complexity and moral richness of our life to Yes/No, On/Off. This is puerile, misleading, and degrading. In stories, it evades any solution but violence and offers the readers mere infantile reassurance. All too often the heroes of such fantasies behave exactly as the villains do, acting with mindless violence, but the hero is on the “right” side and therefore will win."

-Ursula K. LeGuin, afterword to A Wizard of Earthsea.

I re-read this book on my second flight yesterday, and this quote sums up so much of what I feel right now about so many things. 

(via blue-author)

(via missingrache)

192 notes

If this isn’t an entrance to a fairy world then I don’t know what is…

Fairy Glen, Isle of Skye, Scotland, April 2014

(Source: -little-owl-, via gessorly)

150,503 notes


Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, c.1844, Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797 - 1861)

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, c.1844, Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797 - 1861)

(Source: aeromachia, via missingrache)

21 notes

archivesofamericanart:

#ArchivesCats FTW over #MuseumCats because #ArchivesCats can write letters.

These two were written by a sharp-witted gray tabby named Bright Eyes…ok, really it was painter Moses Soyer…to Soyer’s son David while David was away at camp.

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940.

Moses Soyer letter to David Soyer, 1940.

Both from: Moses Soyer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

(via missingrache)

77 notes

awesometraditionalart:

River Dragon by ColletteJEllis

awesometraditionalart:

River Dragon by ColletteJEllis

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138 notes

(Source: iraffiruse, via attilathehunneybun)

313,451 notes

shoatgeep:

he is drowning

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19,513 notes