Brass nails and why I have them.

stunningepiphanies:

brodingershat:

spacedyke:

anagrammaton:

ridgedog:

Ever since last night I’ve been getting a lot of questions about my brass fingernails. First of all. NO, they are not prosthesis. i have them for a specific reason.

Here’s what they look like:

image

19,094 notes

smallspecialcollections:

Today’s post is once again brought to you by the Lindemann Miniature Book Collection, Hamlet: Prince of Denmark: Moving Moments in the Play by William Shakespeare.

This moveable book condenses Shakespeare’s Hamlet into five illustrated scenes. The book is bound to resemble a castle (Elsinore?) and the front gate folds down to reveal the bibliographic information. The top images show Ophelia’s body floating down the river. Bottom images show the final climactic duel.

The book is the work of prolific book artist Maryline P. Adams. Many examples of her playful, intricate miniatures can be found in the Lindemann collection.

Many thanks to Rebecca Levy, graduate student in UVa’s English Department, for creating the above images.

(Lindemann 2463) 

(via missingrache)

84 notes

luckyspike:

Stopped by the barn to give balou smooches before I left for Kentucky! Her shopping list for me was “treats”. Mine for her is a mane tamer

luckyspike:

Stopped by the barn to give balou smooches before I left for Kentucky! Her shopping list for me was “treats”. Mine for her is a mane tamer

4 notes

iluvsouthernafrica:

The Long-tailed Widowbird:

The Long-tailed Widowbird is found in Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, South Africa, Swaziland and Zambia. 

The first time I saw this bird was in book when I was a little girl.  We had to create a project and I instantly fell in love with this beauty.  I first witnessed it with my own eyes a little later riding in a packed minicab with my mother traveling from South Africa to Lesotho to attend a funeral in our village. One flew alongside us as though chaperoning us to the pain and heavy freedom of a family burial.  Squashed in between tired mine-workers, city dwellers going home, I fell in love. It’s my favourite bird. 

I admit I forgot it was Earth Day today until I came across Dynamic Africa's posts on my Dashboard.  Everyday is Earth Day for us Africans I believe.  Nonetheless, seeing all that natural beauty reminded me of my favourite animals, birds, insects from home.

 Photos from various sources. No copyright infringement intended.

(via nightingaletherobber)

730 notes

flygex-eatin-on-softies:

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal
That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.
This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.
Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 
(GIF via NC State University)

animation refereeeennnnnceeeeeee

flygex-eatin-on-softies:

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal

That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.

This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.

Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 

(GIF via NC State University)

animation refereeeennnnnceeeeeee

(via nevertoomanyspiders)

1,868 notes

becausebirds:

Magpie playing with a puppy.

(via nevertoomanyspiders)

9,656 notes

ternpest:

Sand Cat (Anne-Marie Kalus)

(via afuckingcatblog)

12,747 notes

Possibilities

medievalpoc:

Today on medievalpoc we brainstormed historically accurate Asian women as Robin Hood in Medieval England, with possible Trotula the Medieval gynecologist as a Merry Woman, touched on 30 ways to become An Immortal from a non-Western perspective (including eating mermaid meat!), revisited the

1,292 notes

siriussandra asked: I'm considering writing a novel of a female Robin Hood, and was wondering if it could be historically accurate to write her as being half-Asian? The story would take place in the 12th century in England. Do you have any information on Asian people living in England at that time?

medievalpoc:

Of course. Asia and Europe aren’t even a separate landmass, after all.

Here are some links to give you a broader perspective on the kinds of people who would have been in Medieval England, Europe overall, how and why they got there, and how long they would have been there for.

The Silk Road

The Silk Road (Europe-Asia) in Antiquity

The Silk Road (Europe-Asia) via Ottoman Turkey

Pilgrimage and Traditions of Travel

Mongolian Empire

Ottoman Empire

Western Europe via Venice (trade gateway)

Black and Asian Performance in British History (V&A Museum)

Description of Rome from Ancient China

Quick Primer on Medieval Multiculturalism/Medieval Islam

Prehistoric Silk Road: The Steppe Road

tagged: Crusades

 China

 Japan

 India

 Mongolia

P.S. Asian people in Medieval European art are usually “marked” that way via clothing, not physical characteristics.

1,020 notes

medievalpoc:

unfantasmarecoreeuropa submitted to medievalpoc:

Christoph Weiditz´s Trachtenbuch

Weiditz was a german artist of the XVIth century at the service of the Habsburgs who dedicated a year painting the everyday of the people of the territories of Spain, including, Netherlands, Rousillon and the both Sicilies.

In his drawings we can see, among paintings of other spanish people without any reference to otherness, black people and moriscos.

He also painted some aztecs brought from Nueva España to the royal court, that are some of the first images known of aztec people drawn from life.

Sources:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Weiditz

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Trachtenbuch_des_Christoph_Weiditz

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Christoph_Weiditz

http://viaf.org/viaf/59421291/

http://catalogue.bnf.fr/servlet/RechercheEquation;jsessionid=E881875E735E237F1EC10CA41097FF22?TexteCollection=HGARSTUVWXYZ1DIECBMJNQLOKP&TexteTypeDoc=DESNFPIBTMCJOV&Equation=IDP%3Dcb158503661&host=catalogue

http://www.smith.edu/vistas/vistas_web/gallery/detail/aztec-juggler.htm

Hampe, Theodor. 1994 [1927]. Authentic Everyday Dress of the Renaissance: All 154 Plates from the “Trachtenbuch.” New York: Dover Publications.

Massing, Jean Michel. 1991. “Early European Images of America: The Ethnographic Approach.” In Circa 1492: Art in the Age of Exploration, Jay Levenson, ed., pp. 515-520. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art.

Ausgabe von Theodor Hampe: Das Trachtenbuch des Weiditz von seinen Reisen nach Spanien (1529) und den Niederlanden (1531/32). 1927 

Andrea McKenzie Satterfield: The assimilation of the marvelous other: Reading Christoph Weiditz’s Trachtenbuch (1529) as an ethnographic document.

[mod note]

unfantasmarecoreeuropa's submission is so huge I have to break it up into a few posts! One of the things I love about this submission is the depiction of daily lives and normal activities, average families, and of course, the musicians.

194 notes